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Teachings

Below are the teachings from our weekly Torah Studies.  If you would like to join us, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. so we can let you know where and when we meet.

Pinchas B’midbar (Numbers) 25:10-30:1

Torah Portion: Pinchas B’midbar (Numbers) 25:10-30:1

Haftorah Reading I Kings 18:46-19:21

Our reading tonight is filled with many things that deserve our attention. I will try to pick a few to look at and then, before we finish, I want to share some study material with you. One hand out will show a list of Biblical holidays, where they are commanded in the Torah, and where they were celebrated in the Messianic Scripture by Yeshua and the believing community at that time.

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Balak B’midbar(Numbers) 22:2-25:9

Torah Portion: Balak B’midbar(Numbers) 22:2-25:9

Haftorah Reading Micah 5:6-6:8

 

Our Torah portion today plays out a great drama of a pagan king, Balak, and his fear of the Israelites as they arrive at the border of his land. He engages the help of a seer by the name of Bilaam to come and curse the Israelites and in order to save his country.

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Chukat (Regulations) B’midbar(Numbers) 19:1-22:1

Torah Portion: Chukat (Regulations) B’midbar(Numbers) 19:1-22:1

Haftorah Reading Judges 11:1-33

 

This Torah portion is one of the more difficult portions to understand on several levels. The name, chukat, gives us a hint to its difficulty. The word, when used as it is here, can mean regulations. The root of the word means to engrave, as in stone or metal, something that is meant to endure. Chok, the singular form of the word always means something that, on the surface, seems to be illogical or impossible to grasp. In our portion we read where the people involved in preparing the ashes of the red heifer became unclean. However, when those ashes were applied to a person, who was unclean from being in contact with a dead body, that person became clean again. For an Israelite, being unclean by contact with death meant they were excluded from worshiping G-d in the Temple. That person could not come into the confines of the Temple until they were cleansed by the ashes of the red heifer.

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