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Teachings

Below are the teachings from our weekly Torah Studies.  If you would like to join us, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. so we can let you know where and when we meet.

Vayishlach (And He Sent) B’resheet (Genesis) 32-36

Torah Portion:  Vayishlach (And He Sent) B’resheet (Genesis) 32-36

Haftorah Reading: Hosea 11:7-12:12

Today we cover one of the pivotal events in the life of Jacob. He is about to meet his estranged twin, Esau, after 20 years apart. I’m sure the words of his brother are still ringing in his ears. We read them in Genesis 27:41. As Jacob got ready to cross the Jabbok, a stream that became part of the Jordan River, he made plans for the coming meeting. He sent messengers ahead to speak to Esau and to, if possible, placate his anger. He divided his band into groups, hoping if one was attacked the other might escape. He sent a vast amount of livestock over as a gift to Esau. Why do you think he did this? Was it to soothe the anger of Esau or was it to sooth his own guilt over the trick he and his mother had used to fool Isaac and steal the blessing from Esau?

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Vayetze (And He Went Out) B’resheet (Genesis) 28-32

Torah Portion:  Vayetze (And He Went Out) B’resheet (Genesis) 28-32

Haftorah Reading: Hosea 12:13-14:10

This week our Torah portion covers at least 20 years of Jacob’s life. We read of his journey to the home of Laban, his marriage to Rachel and Leah and the birth of 11 of what would become the tribes of Israel. Finally, at the end of the Torah portion we read of his return to the Land.

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Tol’dot (Generations) B’resheet (Genesis) 25-28

Torah Portion:  Tol’dot (Generations) B’resheet (Genesis) 25-28

Haftorah Reading: Malachi 1:1-2:7

Our Torah portion is devoted entirely to Isaac and his family. In fact this is the only portion that gives us much information about the second of the Patriarchs. In our portion we read of many similarities between Isaac and Abraham. Each had to face decades of childlessness, famine, hostile tyrants and rebellious sons. However, they were both very different. Abraham was constantly on the move. Isaac never left the land of Israel. Abraham spent his whole life as a shepherd. Isaac was a shepherd too but he also was a farmer.  Abraham spent his life interacting with people, spreading his faith in God. We see very little of this in Isaac’s life. Isaac was a digger of wells. We read of his digging of wells here in this portion.

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